Catholic Comic Book on Saint Bruno the Carthusian – for our Spanish Readers

En 1086, San Bruno Fundó la Orden de los Cartujos en el Delfinato francés de Chartreuse. En ese lugar el santo estableció su célebre monasterio, combinando las severas reglas de los ermitaños del desierto egipcio con las de los monasterios occidentales.

Screen Shot 2018-06-25 at 12.04.41
Portada de la Revista “Vidas Ejemplares” de México sobre San Bruno

Recientemente, hemos encontrado una Revista Católica para los jóvenes en nuestros Archivos en español sobre la vida de San Bruno el Cartujo.

 

En 1086, San Bruno Fundó la Orden de los Cartujos en el Delfinato francés de Chartreuse. En ese lugar el santo estableció su célebre monasterio, combinando las severas reglas de los ermitaños del desierto egipcio con las de los monasterios occidentales.

Está destinado principalmente para niños, pero también es bueno para adultos y queríamos compartirlo con nuestros lectores. Lo hemos incluido en un documento PDF para que se pueda leer en sus dispositivos electrónicos o se puede imprimir para su uso. El copyright ha expirado.

Por favor, pasa este libro a tus hijos para su educación católica.

Nuestras oraciones y bendiciones están con usted.

⬇︎Haga clic en el enlace a continuación para descargar la revista sobre San Bruno, el fundador de la Orden Cartuja.

Vidas Ejemplares San Bruno

⬆︎Click on the link above to download the magazine on San Bruno the founder of the Carthusian Order

We recently found a Catholic Magazine for the young in our Archives in Spanish on the life of Saint Bruno the Carthusian.

In 1086, San Bruno founded the Order of the Carthusians in the French Delfinato de Chartreuse. In this place the saint established his famous monastery, combining the severe rules of the hermits of the Egyptian desert with those of the western monasteries.

It is intended mainly for children but also good for adults and we wanted to share it with our readers. We have mede it into a PDF document so that it can be read on your electronic devices or it can be printed out for your use. The copyright has expired.

Please pass this book on to your children for their Catholic education.

Our prayers and Blessings are with you.

The Consuetudines of Guigo I

Translation in English from the Latin, Click below.

The Consuetudine of Guigo I, 5th Prior of the Carthusian Order

Guigues du Chastel

Fifth prior of the Grande Chartreuse, legislator of the Carthusian Order and ascetical writer, born at Saint-Romain in Dauphiné in 1083; died 27 July, 1137.

He became a monk of the Grande Chartreuse in 1107, and three years later his brethren elected him Prior.

To Guigues the Carthusian Order in great measure owes its fame, if not its very existence.

When he became prior, only two charterhouses existed, the Grande Chartreuse and the Calabrian house where St. Bruno had died; nine more were founded during his twenty-seven years’ as Prior. These new foundations made it necessary to reduce to writing the traditional customs of the mother-house. Guigues’s  “Consuetudines”, composed in 1127 or 1128, have always remained the basis of all Carthusian legislation.

After the disastrous avalanche of 1132, Guigues rebuilt the Grande Chartreuse on the present site.

A man of considerable learning, endowed with a tenacious memory and the gift of eloquence, Guigues was a great organizer and disciplinarian. He was a close friend of St. Bernard and of Peter the Venerable, both of whom have left accounts of the impression of sanctity which he made upon them. His name is inscribed in certain martyrologies on 27 July, and he is sometimes called “Venerable” or “Blessed”, yet the Bollandists can find “no trace whatever of any ecclesiastical cultus”.

Guigues edited the letters of St. Jerome, but his edition is lost. Of his genuine writings there are still in existence, besides the “Consuetudines,” a “Life of St. Hugh of Grenoble”, whom he had known intimately, written by command of Pope Innocent II after the canonisation of the saint in 1134; “Meditations”, and six letters (P.L., CLIII). These letters are all that remain of a great number, many of them addressed to the most distinguished men of the day. Guigues’s letters to St. Bernard are lost, but some of the saint’s replies are extant.